This is The Australian’s 8 December 2022 headline. It reflects the result of its 2022 CEO Survey. We’re not surprised. It echoes the observation made in our previous blog about the new laws getting much C-suite interest.

This interest, and those concerns, stem from the likely shift away from enterprise bargaining and towards terms and

Across a range of disciplines, the Fair Work Amendment (Secure Jobs, Better Pay) Act 2022 will bring a paradigm shift. Indeed, on our count, there are thirteen new civil penalty laws aimed at employers arising from new obligations.

But the most profound change will be in the area of workplace bargaining as our previous blogs

In our previous blog, Chris Gardner and I explained why in our view, if the Secure Jobs, Better Pay Bill was made law, it would spell the end of single-enterprise bargaining. We said this would happen because many employers would be roped-in or otherwise pressured to join multi-enterprise deals, resulting in industry-level enterprise agreements much

Make no mistake about it, the Fair Work Legislation Amendment (Secure Jobs, Better Pay) Bill 2022 is the most significant thing to happen to this country’s industrial relations landscape since John Howard’s WorkChoices in 2005.

In fact, the Bill is the most significant development since the introduction of enterprise bargaining in 1993, when Paul Keating

Seyfarth is committed to helping leading employers and in-house counsel adapt to the rapidly changing business landscape and prepare for what may lie ahead. As part of that commitment, since 2017, Seyfarth has carried out a suite of initiatives based on helping clients understand the future of work and empowering them to tackle emerging workplace