Workplace policy and process

LinkedIn is the biggest online network of professionals in the world. Many employers encourage staff to use LinkedIn to promote their organisation.

While employees may share content relating to their organisation, they tend to think of their profile as personal to them, like a resume, which is available to recruiters, colleagues and clients.

Yes, the LinkedIn account belongs to the individual, but that doesn’t mean that ‘anything goes’.

On signing up, you agree with LinkedIn to provide truthful information and to not misrepresent your current or previous positions or qualifications. Even so, we have all noticed information on LinkedIn that isn’t 100% accurate.

You may have had a similar experience where you look up a contact on LinkedIn, and their profile shows them at a job they left months ago.

Perhaps they are on gardening leave, or they have been exited against their will and don’t want to say they are unemployed. There is the potential that their account was connected to a work email address that they can no longer access, and signing back in has become too problematic.

But in more concerning circumstances, some people use their LinkedIn profile to paper over gaps in a resume – this is an age-old issue, but with LinkedIn and online platforms, it is increasingly visible.

Other than getting frustrated, what can employers do when an employee fails to update their LinkedIn profile?

There are options to manage this risk as an employer:

  • Writing to the employee and asking them to correct the details
  • Using the LinkedIn feature to ‘disconnect’ that contact from your organisation, removing them from search results and the list of employees
  • Reminding departing employees of expectations in exit interviews
  • Including a term of a release agreement or deed which can be specifically enforced if necessary.
Is it worth the trouble from a commercial perspective? The answer may well depend on the individual involved. It is always a balancing act, but when rights and obligations are clearly defined, resources like LinkedIn are proven to work in everyone’s interest.

Subscribe to receive the next Workplace Law & Strategy blog direct to your inbox.

One of the more interesting recent developments in relation to work has been the continual rise and development of the gig economy – that is, workers developing niche areas of specialist expertise, but having careers characterised by a series of interactions with various organisations, rather than being employed by one company for many years. This doesn’t just mean a person working in multiple jobs over the course of their life, but that they are much more likely to be running their own independent business providing services to customers.

Over the last 15 – 20 years, many businesses have made the distinction between core and non-core functions, using that distinction to drive and make judgment calls about the nature and form of their relationships with those contributing to their business (including employees, contractors, suppliers or others). With the development of the gig economy, businesses will need to be more sophisticated in their analysis, taking a much more fundamental and holistic view of how they want the business actually to operate – entrepreneurs, leaders and managers need to consider how the emerging gig economy will impact on the structure of the business’s relationships with its contributors.

So, how can your business make the most of the opportunities that a gig economy offers, while also managing the legal, reputational and business risks of dealing with multiple independent contractors? Continue Reading The future of work: using the gig economy to your advantage

The Victorian Supreme Court recently issued a stunning decision awarding an employee over $600,000 comprising $210,000 for pain and suffering and the balance for lost past and future income, despite the employee having a significant pre-existing psychiatric illness and a finding that no bullying had occurred.   Continue Reading Damages in bullying claims – the stakes are rising even higher

boxing-gloves-375473Ronda “Rowdy” Rousey was at the top of her field, training hard and winning harder.  Her success had built her brand.  So much so that she diversified into acting with parts in two big budget, big publicity movies. Then it happened. Her reputation did not match her performance. Immediately the questions started – would she come back?

As the saying goes ‘the bigger you are the harder you fall’. Continue Reading Would you survive a knockout?

As the Beliebers of Australia will tell you, tickets for Justin Bieber’s 2017 “Purpose World Tour” were released in Victoria on Wednesday, 12 October at precisely 1pm.  In a frenzy, fans across Victoria were using their employer’s time and resources to purchase (or miss out on) tickets.

Beiber imageAs society becomes increasingly digitalised, it’s now common for employees to use their employer’s internet access for non-work related purposes. Referred to as ‘cyber slacking’, can be a source of frustration for many employers who endeavour to limit recreational internet usage for staff. On the other hand, many employees feel that due to the increasing demands of work life, such as long hours and weekend work, personal internet usage ‘on the job’ should be accommodated. Is workplace flexibility just about leaving work 15 minutes early for an appointment, or does it include personal admin tasks that are done during working hours? Continue Reading Managing personal admin during working hours: is it too late now to say sorry?

In the last five years, with the development of information technology and mobile devices, the distinction between being “at work” and “off work” has been profoundly altered. Working time is no longer confined to being in an office and working days are both more intense and infinitely extendable, making monitoring working times even more complex.Switching off

Coupled with a global economy, many employees feel that they are permanently connected to their work, irrespective of time zones and local laws. Continue Reading Switching off: making sense of working time laws in Europe

Working from homeThere are lessons to be learnt about the future of work in one of my favourite episodes of The Simpsons titled ‘King-size Homer’, from the seventh season which aired over 20 years ago.

As you may recall, Mr Burns tries to get employees at the nuclear power plant ‘in shape’ by leading a workplace exercise program. As expected, however, Homer avoids this by taking advantage of the rule that someone who weighs more than 300 pounds will be classified as disabled and can then work from home. Unsurprisingly, he manages to gain the necessary weight and a computer terminal is installed in the Simpson house to allow him to do his very safety-critical work (monitoring a nuclear reactor!) remotely. Continue Reading The future of work: avoiding the nuclear reactor bird

Phone

Are you getting the best advice when it comes to health and safety compliance?

When we deliver legal briefings, both in Australia and internationally, top-of-mind for Boards and Senior Executives is the health, safety and welfare of people affected by their operations. This is how it should be – so everyone breathe a collective sigh of relief (insert sigh).
When it comes to seeking commercially sound legal advice on these issues – whose advice should you be seeking? Continue Reading A word of advice, on advice

PokemonOur colleagues in the US recently published an article on Pokémon GO, Nintendo’s augmented reality game involving scrambling around real-world locations to ‘catch’ virtual beasts with your smart phone. (There’s a sentence I’ll never write again!).

The article explains that, despite the game’s popularity, employers have cause for concern in relation to data and security and workplace safety.

Pokémon GO is similarly taking our fair shores by storm. It seems all too easy to poke fun at this new gaming mobile app. However, as the article highlights, if employees are out to ‘catch ‘em all’, employers could very well find themselves caught in a nasty game of software security, privacy and workplace safety issues.

Anime (see what I did there?), that’s enough from me.

I hope you enjoy the read – Pokémon NO: New app creates risks for employers