Workplace policy and process

In Part 1 of our series on reductions in force (RIFs) in the Asia Pacific, we addressed the importance of planning and strategy timing. In Part 2, we consider the next three things that we recommend multinational employers look out for: (#2) restructuring rationale; (#3) employee selection and redeployment, and (#4) employee/employee representative consultation.

#2

Seyfarth recently hosted a webinar entitled Asia-Pacific Reductions in Force: Ten Things to Look Out for, addressing the practical issues employers should be aware of when restructuring in APAC. We shared examples across a variety of countries in the region, including Australia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the People’s Republic of China

Already stretched HR, ER, WHS and Legal teams are about to confront a (seemingly) never-ending stream of law changes that will require cross-team collaboration to operationalise.

At a time when there are already broader economic and market challenges for businesses, leading employers will need to have sufficient resourcing and planning to confront the

Many in our readership will have embarked (or are embarking) upon a compliance audit of workplace entitlements. Anyone who has done so will appreciate the difficulties associated with what becomes a massive and complex task. The future will see monthly pay reviews as a matter of course rather than large and costly remediation processes.

Indeed

We have psychosocial risks, of which sexual harassment is one of the most common hazards. We have a new positive duty to prevent sexual harassment at a federal level that we discussed in our previous blog. The duties are at least similar: “So far as is reasonably practicable’’ under health and safety law and

The arrival of a four-day workweek (where staff work fewer hours with no loss of pay) is a hot topic for employers in Australia and overseas. Employees generally see this work arrangement as a viable way to maintain a work/life balance, whilst employers are keen to retain talent through innovative arrangements that keep them

Gone are the days when workplace safety belongs only in factories and mines. In 2023 criminal charges can and will be brought in relation to hazards and their associated risks that traverse every industry, every workplace and cannot be seen by the naked eye. Caution signs will not “cut the mustard”.

Born originally from the

This is The Australian’s 8 December 2022 headline. It reflects the result of its 2022 CEO Survey. We’re not surprised. It echoes the observation made in our previous blog about the new laws getting much C-suite interest.

This interest, and those concerns, stem from the likely shift away from enterprise bargaining and towards terms and

Across a range of disciplines, the Fair Work Amendment (Secure Jobs, Better Pay) Act 2022 will bring a paradigm shift. Indeed, on our count, there are thirteen new civil penalty laws aimed at employers arising from new obligations.

But the most profound change will be in the area of workplace bargaining as our previous blogs

In our previous blog, Chris Gardner and I explained why in our view, if the Secure Jobs, Better Pay Bill was made law, it would spell the end of single-enterprise bargaining. We said this would happen because many employers would be roped-in or otherwise pressured to join multi-enterprise deals, resulting in industry-level enterprise agreements much